PharmaCyte Biotech’s (OTCMKTS:PMCB) encapsulation technology could soon transform the treatment and
management of difficult-to-treat diseases. 
The company is nearing the second phase of clinical evaluation in
locally advanced pancreatic cancer, which will give patients hope by shrinking
tumors for easier surgical removal. 

PharmaCyte to test its Cell-in-a-Box tech

Usually, clinical trials are very important in developing new treatments. In this case, PharmaCyte will conduct the upcoming trial with two objectives in mind. They will be focusing on the future of encapsulation technology as well as its treatment for pancreatic cancer. The ability to shrink tumors will significantly address a genuine unmet medical need for unresponsive patients to first-line therapies. Equally, the other significance for PharmaCyte is to use its first clinical trial invalidating or proving that the Cell-in-a Box encapsulation tech is safe and effective to use in patients. 

Kenneth
Waggoner, the CEO of PharmaCyte, indicated that the company was on the verge of
transforming future treatment. He added that there is constant development of
new cell lines especially genetically engineered ones for the treatment of
various diseases. Therefore with the validation
of the Cell-in-a-Box technology
, it will be possible to help the cell lines
becomes successful in the treatment of diseases per the design of the cell
line.

Encapsulation tech as an alternative therapy

During the Phase 2b clinical trial, the company will introduce the technology to the public. Cell-in-a-Box is a cellular therapy protecting over 20,000 genetically engineered live cells. The tech will be under FDA trail, and if it can demonstrate that it can shrink tumors in patients, that will be a huge milestone. Similarly, it could be a success if the cells in the microcapsule can remain viable as well as be within the area they are placed.

The lead
investigator in the clinical trial will be a renowned clinician and oncologist,
Manuel Hidalgo. Hidalgo stated that the objective of the trial is to establish
the efficacy of the approach relative to other treatments in managing locally
advanced pancreatic cancer. The technology will become a therapeutic option for
LAPC patients if it meets the endpoint.